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Show will commemorate late artist Dale Auger

Dale Auger

“My dad was a huge supporter of First Nations art and artists being represented on the same level as non-Indigenous artists, representing our own images and traditional knowledge.” —Neepin Auger

By Paula E. Kirman
Windspeaker.com Contributor
 

Dale Auger was a Sakaw Cree artist and storyteller from Bigstone Cree Nation in northern Alberta had a huge influence in both art and education until his untimely death from cancer in 2008 at the age of 50.

On Nov. 2 and Nov. 3, Auger will be remembered through art with the Dale Auger Memorial Art Show. It will take place at the Bragg Creek Community Centre and will feature an art show and sale of new and original works from some of Canada's top and emerging First Nations artists.

Auger often told audiences how proud he was to be a Sakaw Cree man and have access to the symbols and stories of his ancestors, given to him in teachings from his Elders and through his dreams. In Windspeaker.com’s Footprints article about Dale Auger, we wrote he especially enjoyed sharing the story of his life ­ from his teenage years of driving around the back roads of northern Alberta with friends near High Prairie, to his venture into the halls of learning at the University of Calgary.

Auger himself used to host art shows featuring First Nations artists, and now, in turn, they are honouring his legacy.

Read our Footprints article here: http://www.windspeaker.com/news/footprints/dr-dale-auger-encouraged-artists-to-get-out-of-their-comfort-zones/

“I felt now was the right time to celebrate something near and dear to his heart,” said Neepin Auger, Dale's daughter. “My dad had this art show in the past, including many of the artists we have joining us this year.”

Neepin Auger

The event will feature the work of 17 First Nations artists, who will be in attendance. It will also have Métis singer Pamela June, and traditional Indigenous dancing and singing.

“My dad was a huge supporter of First Nations art and artists being represented on the same level as non-Indigenous artists, representing our own images and traditional knowledge,” said Neepin, who herself is an artist and educator.

“I hope most people will enjoy and celebrate the art that we as First Nations peoples have to offer, she said. This is a show with 100 per cent First Nations and Métis artists coming together to celebrate the arts and stories of our people. We have everything from silversmiths, paintings, stone work and sewing. Not only is this for sale purposes, but to educate the public on First Nations Art and Artists. This is also a great opportunity for reconciliation.”

For more information: http://daleaugermemorial.com

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